What’s new at filmquarterly.org

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From the introductory pages of their cowritten book Queer Cinema in the World, Karl Schoonover and Rosalind Galt plot a course for their readers by mapping the themes they will address throughout the book: counterpublics, covert and overt identities, and the legibility of sexuality and politics across and between different (social, political, economic, national, regional, linguistic) cultures and different cinematic cultures.

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La bataille d’Alger (The Battle of Algiers, Gillo Pontecorvo), has turned fifty. In itself, this fact is trivial; after all, a great many films are reaching their half-century mark these days. The difference is that The Battle of Algiers seems to reach far beyond cinema itself to attain an “endlessly renewed contemporary resonance.”

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Whose Latin American Cinema?; The Battle of Algiers at 50; Spike Lee does Chicago; An Interview With Julie Dash; film festival reports from Il Cinema Ritrovato, Locarno, and Toronto; and more!

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from Film Quarterly Fall 2016, Volume 70, Number 1 Barbara McBane Everything changed in 1984. I sang so loud I exploded. Since then I explode from time to time.1 1. Desynchronization How is it that Chantal Akerman’s films feel so close to raw experience? Akerman has said, “I want the spectator to feel…the time used […]

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Book excerpt available! Click here to get started. from Film Quarterly Fall 2016, Volume 70, Number 1 Regina Longo Michael Boyce Gillespie’s introduction to Film Blackness and the Idea of Black Film begins with a series of questions that seem to be posed to reader and author alike, for he declares that this book is […]

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A special dossier on Chantal Akerman with articles by Ivone Margulies, Laura Mulvey, and an interview by B. Ruby Rich; plus a report from the goEAST film festival; and more!

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Laura Horak’s first monograph, Girls Will Be Boys: Cross-Dressed Women, Lesbians, and American Cinema, 1908–1934, is refreshing and invigorating. In a moment when pop culture is ablaze with stories of the “novelty” of transgender and gender nonconforming people, this historian was delighted to sink into a thoroughly researched book that was ten years in the making.

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To judge by the critical enthusiasm with which the second season of Amazon Prime’s Transparent (2014–) series has been embraced, Jill Soloway not only has a big trans-affirmative hit on her hands but has succeeded in stimulating a lively conversation about queerness, trans politics, and television representation within the broader society.

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Introductory film history classes used to teach students that Busby Berkeley films were popular during the Depression years because audiences yearned for an escape from the realities of their lives. And they laughed in those screenings, considered the films dated and silly, and the audiences that flocked to them dumb, irresponsible, superficial. Today, in a similarly critical economic period, audiences plunge headlong into modern fantasies about superheroes or other worlds.

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Jill Soloway’s Transparent and the New Television; Ex Machina In The Garden; Rituparno Ghosh’s Bariwali; interviews with Christopher Harris, Annie Baker, and Hanna Polak; festival reports from IDFA and Sundance; and more!

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This page contains documentation of the final two nights of the Eduardo Coutinho retrospective presented by the Pacific Film Archive at the Berkeley Art Museum (BAMPFA)

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Book excerpt available! Click here to get started. from Film Quarterly Spring 2016, Volume 69, Number 3 Regina Longo There is no easy way into an anthology of primary source texts of German-language film theory, originally published between 1907 and 1933, featuring well over 250 carefully curated texts appearing for the first time in English-language […]

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I am not interested in the short take. I want the temporal dimension of things.—Eduardo Coutinho

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Eduardo Coutinho, the greatest documentary filmmaker in the last half-century of Brazilian cinema, is woefully underrecognized in the United States and has not been adequately incorporated into the global history of documentary cinema

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I remember when. Today, conversations that recall an era when there were only a handful of broadcast channels, no internet, and only a few repertory houses for relief do really sound like dad or grandpa reminiscing about World War II or Vietnam: a nod to a time that seems at once tedious and unimaginable.

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A Dossier on Eduardo Coutinho; Festival Reports From Trinidad + Tobago, Copenhagen, Pordenone; an Interview with László Nemes; and more!

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This eulogy was delivered by Rabbi Delphine Horvilleur at the funeral service of Chantal Akerman on October 13, 2015, at Père Lachaise cemetery. Thanks to Rabbi Horvilleur for permission to publish it here.

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“People need a screen.” With those words, author/activist Naomi Klein galvanized the room at the CBC Glenn Gould Theatre, where a daylong documentary discussion was held in September in conjunction with the Toronto International Film Festival [see “Toronto Turns Forty” in this issue]../

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Carol, Jurassic World, The Look of Silence; Carlos Fuentes, Cinephile; RIP: Wes Craven, Candida Royalle, & Homage To Chantal Akerman; Festival Reports From Odessa, Mumbai, Toronto; Finding Lost Films; and more!

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Homay King’s book, her second, is the kind that warrants more than one reading. But there is no awkward or dense prose, often a hallmark of theoretical texts that turn reading into an academic exercise.

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Swedish writer-director Roy Andersson explores human behavior and its consequences. His Living Trilogy of films, begun in 2000, takes stock of what it means to be a human being. What is human existence?

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Documentary has been in the grip of a shape-shifting transformation, thanks to shifts in technologies, genre, journalism, and the status of evidence and veracity. Not since the 1980s—when the invention of camcorders, VHS tape, and VCR machines, alongside the debut of cable television, fueled the last great upheaval—has the field been so explosively inventive and destabilized

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Bruno Dumont’s L’il Quinquin; The Folk/Minjian Memory Project in China; Roy Andersson: An Interview; Carlos Adriano’s Sem Titulo #1: Dance of Leitfossil; Cannes 2015 Festival Report; and more!

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Book excerpt available! Click here to get started. from Film Quarterly Summer 2015, Volume 68, Number 4 Regina Longo When I met with Bernie Cook in his office on the Georgetown University campus—where he is Associate Dean in Georgetown College (the University’s College of Arts and Sciences) and Director of Film and Media Studies—he confirmed […]

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The Centre Pompidou in Paris recently celebrated the centenary of Marguerite Duras’s birth with minimal means and quiet panache: an exhibit, “Duras Song,” occupied a corner of the Centre’s public library while a complete retrospective of all her films was shown in the Centre’s movie theatres.

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Black Media Matters: The Bombing Of Osage Avenue; Jia Zhangke’s A Touch Of Sin; Mickey Horror: Escape From Tomorrow; Marguerite Duras Centennial; Interview With Eugène Green; and more…

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In February 2015, Anita Hill came to the University of California, Santa Cruz, to deliver a lecture, “Speaking Truth to Power: Gender and Racial Equality, 1991-2015.” She also presented a seminar, “‘An Intersectional Problem’: Gender, Race, Class, Political Standing and the Sexual Assault of Black Women.”

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When I interviewed Cara Caddoo for this column, we talked about the current state of racial politics in the United States. Despite the long road ahead and the critical, collective work that must be done to achieve equality, historians like Cara Caddoo are bringing to the surface narratives that will become part of a larger conversation of the history of race and media in the US.

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Jane Campion and Jenji Kohan each premiered television series in 2013 that used genre to facilitate pointed interventions in postfeminist representational paradigms.

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If timing is everything, then the cycle of a quarterly is a frustrating one, especially for a film journal. A quarter of a year: it’s close enough to film premieres and television rollouts for the writing to be inspired, yet once into production, it’s still months away from delivery to the world.

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SPECIAL DOSSIER ON RICHARD LINKLATER; plus Citizenfour, Top of the Lake and Orange Is the New Black, Jauja, Page Views, and more…

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from Film Quarterly Winter 2014, Volume 68, Number 2 Claudia Gorbman In sound cinema everything—narrative development, mise-en-scène, editing, other sounds—is normally organized around the voice.1 Michel Chion thus asserts that the sound film is vococentric. Strange, then, how seldom scholars and critics attend to voices. Perhaps the focus remains so extensively on the image as […]

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Eric Smoodin and Jon Lewis first met on a college campus as film studies graduate students in 1979. When the opportunity arose to talk to them about their latest collaboration, I welcomed the chance to learn about the process behind putting together an anthology that is very likely to become a staple in college classrooms

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FQ Editor B. Ruby Rich provides an introduction to the Winter 2014 issue

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FEATURES: The Master’s Voice; The Western Film And Psychoanalysis; Xavier Dolan Gets Respect; The Cinematic Life Of The Implosion; plus Festival Reports, Page Views, and more…

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Frantz Fanon was born on the Caribbean island of Martinique in 1925, and grew up a gentleman of the French Empire. He realized, when he came from the island of Martinique to the mainland of France in Europe, through involvement in the French army elsewhere, that his class privilege among his own black people did not mean anything in the country of the colonizing master

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Summertime is usually an interregnum for Film Quarterly and many of its readers: a time between university terms and, with the singular exceptions of Locarno and Karlovy Vary, between film festivals as well: after Cannes, before Toronto/Telluride/Venice/New York. As this issue went to press, however, production was repeatedly interrupted by a need to attend to the news.

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Kristen Whissel’s latest book, Spectacular Digital Effects: CGI and Contemporary Cinema, examines the relationship between narrative and spectacle in contemporary blockbuster cinema. Whissel is no stranger to this terrain. She has been deepening her theories of spectacular narrativity since she began publishing on the subject of early cinema and the American experience of technological modernity.

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FEATURES: Watermelon Man; Cinema’s Year Of OS Romance; The Missing Picture; Richard Linklater’s Instant Epic; Epistolary Architecture In Three Recent Video Games; Concerning Violence; plus Festival Reports, Page Views, and more…

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About two-thirds of the way through Maleficent, Princess Aurora—she who will become Sleeping Beauty—stands near a cliff where she meets a magical winged fish that has left the water and floats in the air before her.

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FEATURES: Cinema’s Sex Acts; Ten Thousand Waves; Male Beauty and the Erotics of Intimacy; Under the Skin; plus Festival Reports, Page Views, and more…

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How to make manifest the spirit and intentions of a movement that has yet to triumph over an oppressive but dominant adversary? Issue a manifesto. Stand up and speak out.

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The so-called “crisis” in Europe and North America is a euphemism, peddled by those who have lost nothing in the past few years, to soften the unacceptable shock of the new social-economic order.

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I was in Madrid to take part in a new collective research project on cinema of the 1980s. And during a chilly January three theaters were showing period pieces set in different historical moments.

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FEATURES: An Interview with Agnieszka Holland; Yang Fudong and the Gallery Film; IDA‘s Window on Vanished Lives; plus Festival Reports, Reviews, and more…

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Eleven years after its launch, the Morelia International Film Festival (Festival Internacional de Cine de Morelia, FICM) is still Mexico’s most vibrant venue for both up-and-coming and established filmmakers.

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